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A structured decision making approach to choosing and justifying the right sprayer

Take home messages

  • There are many variables to consider when choosing a sprayer and each will be weighted differently from business to business depending on the farming model (enterprise mix, farming system, typical rotation, spread of farming operations, etc.), the need or want to optimise efficiency, availability of labour and lifestyle decisions.
  • Before upgrading the machine there may be options to increase field and overall efficiency of existing machine.
  • First priority is for the machine to be ‘fit for purpose’.
  • The capital invested can be similar between a self-propel (SP) and a tow-behind outfit when aiming to match field capacity.
  • Alternative uses for the machine and the likelihood of spraying where higher clearance is required, are key cost-of- ownership drivers.
  • Tank size and boom width can sometimes be a trade-off against spraying speed.
  • Lifestyle considerations can affect the decision.

Read more: A structured decision making approach to choosing and justifying the right sprayer

Show me the profit - Using benchmarking to classify costs and identify profit drivers

One of the most critical farm business skills is being able to understand, measure and manage the drivers of profit. Whilst ‘gut feel’ is often an approach taken by growers, this can be made more accurate by applying some easy to use tools to fully understand the key factors driving farm profitability.

Read more: Show me the profit - Using benchmarking to classify costs and identify profit drivers

Farm business models – why is there interest in the alternatives?

Key points

  • The family farm business model, where the land is owned and operated by the family, has generally served Australian agriculture well.  However it does have some limitations.
  • Alternative farm business models can enhance farm business profitability, provide more effective risk management and assist with business succession and access to capital.
  • It is important to recognise that the financial performance of farm business models differs in terms of profitability, return on assets owned, working capital requirements and exposure to risk. 

Read more: Farm business models – why is there interest in the alternatives?